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Poster: light into ashes Date: Mar 2, 2010 1:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: How many of you....

WT's question about the effect of the Dead's taping policy got me to wondering -
How many of you first got into the Dead through hearing a live show? (NOT through studio albums, or actually going to live shows.)
Admittedly this place will be a limited (and skewed) sample, especially since the band hasn't existed for 15 years, and you're all obviously internet listeners today - but I wonder whether many people actually were first turned on by passed-along tapes, or whether the official live albums / radio shows made more converts. Or whether the MYSTIQUE was all it took!

As for me, I hated the Dead until I heard Two From The Vault. Didn't know they ever sounded like that. The lights turned on, & the next day I went out & bought every live Dead album in the record stores. Some of them sucked, too...

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Poster: fenario80 Date: Mar 3, 2010 9:50am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

good question. Europe 72 was my first Dead record, so that was a good start, but I didn't really get hooked until someone loaned me One From The Vault (in the late 70's it was called "The Make-Believe Ballroom") and Englishtown, both on bootleg vinyl. I wore out side one of OFTV playing that Help-Slipknot-Franklin's over and over and oevr again.

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Poster: fireeagle Date: Mar 2, 2010 2:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

1971 - skull fuck

was into hard & heavy stuff back then > hendrix, zepp, deep purple ... (same as now really) and skull fuck came on like a breath of fresh air. bought immediately all previous dead albums and continued buying subsequent albums as they were released. got all the official releases >90 (no compilations) on vinyl + tapes and tons of cds and digital stuff

my 1st tape : 78-09-16 //ollin arageed > fire >...
had it coupla weeks after that show

wonder what were u listening to b4 discovering that u really dont hate the dead, lia???


This post was modified by fireeagle on 2010-03-02 22:24:53

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Mar 2, 2010 7:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Strange - when I looked at this thread a while ago, there were a couple posts here that have disappeared. (Vapors?)

Anyway, before the Dead I liked harder-rocking folks like Cream, Hendrix, the Who. About the only Dead I heard was radio crap like Truckin, Casey Jones, Touch. I saw a show on TV, think it was the 1987 Ticket to New Years, and god was it awful, put me off even considering them for years.

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Poster: vapors Date: Mar 3, 2010 2:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Busted – sorry, I was intending to repost, using less words ... Basically I am in awe of how you write so well about our music, and in light of your revelation that you had not seen them live, I was curious how you came to be such a proficient and enthusiastic blogger. But then I wondered if it was cool to put you on the spot like that.

Regarding the topic of this thread, I grew up with the albums, but never had a live tape until after I had started seeing them live – an experience that greatly escalated and consumed much of my life from 84 -92.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Mar 3, 2010 5:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Your post was fine, there was no need to rewrite!

My own essays seem badly-written & repetitive to me, so I'm glad others see some value in them.
Not to chatter about myself, but I came to write about the Dead quite by accident, little by little. Only when you take one step does the next become clear....
Basically I tried to fill a void. No one was writing the kind of posts I wanted to see, so I had to try making them myself. The idea was to try to encourage others as well, but...so far it's been a lonely path. Ironically, those with the most Dead-listening experience & knowledge tend not to write very much! (Or, they just vanish over time as they lose interest.) So the same things have to get rediscovered over & over...

Actually I'm rather surprised that people feel that seeing the Dead was a necessary step to liking or appreciating them. I understand that viewpoint, but I didn't start liking the GD until well after they'd ceased to be. Lots of listeners today are in the same boat. And eventually, people with memories of shows will dwindle away, and listeners of the future will be left only with the music.

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Poster: snow_and_rain Date: Mar 3, 2010 8:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

I don't think it's necessary to have seen the Dead to appreciate them. Hell, there are plenty of artists I love who I never saw live (see Davis, Miles). Not only that, but just to say that you "saw" the Dead doesn't say much. I never saw a show before 1990, so I'm sure there are plenty of people who would try to tell me that I will never fully "get it."

On the other hand, I did get something out of seeing them live that I just couldn't get anywhere else. And maybe it's just the way I'm wired, but I still get goosebumps when I hear the special moments from even the most mediocre shows that I saw.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 3, 2010 7:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

>Basically I tried to fill a void. No one was writing the kind of posts I wanted to see, so I had to try making them myself. The idea was to try to encourage others as well, but...so far it's been a lonely path.

But others appreciate it so much. Just sayin'.

>eventually, people with memories of shows will dwindle

Ack! Don't say that! :0

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 3, 2010 8:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

LIA – I’m sure that there are many people who appreciate the obvious research that goes into your essays. It’s evidently something you get a great degree of satisfaction from (I can’t believe that all that effort goes into something you don’t enjoy!) and I’m sure that the fact that you’ve approached the task as an archival detective rather than relying on your memories is all to the good. (I saw the Dead about a half dozen times in 16 years and if I’m honest the only things that really stuck with me were Eyes of the World in 74 and Bird Song in 90 – not a heck of a lot to build a critical essay on…)

As to whether you’re going to encourage others to follow suit, I just wonder if there’s a possibility that some, while having a great deal of respect for what you’ve done, will feel intimidated, or perhaps inhibited is better, about having to produce something comparable. I’m betting there are some who see a damn big chunk of text and move swiftly on down the page to the smartass one-liners elsewhere.

Anyway, there are people here with something to say beyond the joshing and jiving that goes on daily, and even if what we get doesn’t always amount to an in-depth analysis it’s all part of keeping the community together. So don’t feel like you’re on a lonely path – there are plenty of people travelling along with you. They’re just speaking in different voices.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Mar 3, 2010 3:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Yeah, I know lots of folks probably see those huge dense blocks of text & skip to the next post; and I've heard complaints that they're too long & academic... But that's fine.
I understand being intimidated by someone else's post, lots of times I've felt like I can never match what someone's written. My familiarity with the Dead's shows is minimal compared to some folks, and my musical knowledge is nonexistent... My secret is persistence - I just keep at it.
As I've said before, I lurked here for a year because I felt I had nothing to add. But seeing bigger comparative posts by folks like C.Hucker & HeLives, I realized, I could do that too - and use the little skill I have to raise the bar for Dead-writing & possibly inspire those who come after me.
It is an exercise in frustration though, since I try to write above my level, and the results look pitiful to me. Can't say it's not rewarding, though.

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Mar 3, 2010 3:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Dont sell yourself short!

Your analysis and music discussion consistently raise the bar here to levels very infrequently attained otherwise. And you dont get distracted by nonsense like some of us frequently do :)

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Poster: mgg Date: Mar 2, 2010 2:21pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

What won me over was their live performance, I saw the Garcia band first - it really was the most wonderful afternoon ever! I was blown away.
Now I live here on archive -- getting my daily dose of the dead.
And loving Furthur -- go see them!

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Mar 3, 2010 7:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Leave it to me to take things down a notch.......

Like so many great discoveries throughout history, my real introduction to the Dead came about because I was chasing skirt.

Tower Theatre run in June of 76 - school was out and a buddy of mine and I were trying to figure out how to get to Upper Darby which was only about a half hour from Wilmington. He overheard someone at church talking about going and asked if we could tag along. He said yes (as long as we brought beer or gas money) and off we went. I must admit the first night was underwhelming, but his sister had come along and she was freakin' hot. I had no intention of going the next three nights until she asked me if I would go with her. I do believe it was the hormones that helped usher me onto the bus.

We ended up dating for 2 1/2 years and then she dumped me over the phone, on Valentine's Day.

I still love the Dead, but I hate Valentine's Day.........

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Poster: BVD Date: Mar 2, 2010 9:42pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Heard bits and pieces of American Beauty. One of my best friends in H.S. loved 'em and she took me to the Felt Forum on 12/6 and 12/7/71. Life changing experience.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Mar 3, 2010 7:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Tapes. I had heard some studio stuff before and was left wondering what the fuss was all about. Then a friend's roomate whipped out a most imposing bong and threw in Augusta 84. By Dew, I was hooked. My only regret is that it took so long. I had been offered tickets for years by friends to shows, but always deferred, using the reasoning that based on the studio recordings, how much better could they be live? AND by then (Fall/Winter 84) Jerry was expanding at a rate greater than the national debt and the number of truly quality shows I got to see were few (the fact that I made it through 85 still loving the band is a true testament to the effect that first taste had on me). Well, I am thankful for the ones I did see, and, more importantly, the friends I have made along the way.

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Poster: wineland Date: Mar 3, 2010 7:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

My uncle gave me tapes of his Europe 72 records. For me that is the true sound of the Dead. Hearing shows from 72 is like coming back home. I got Europe 72 the summer of 88 and didn't go see them live until summer of 90. A friend's Mom insisted we needed to see the Dead, you just can't listen to them at home was her claim. She drove the three of us college friends to Eugene, spread our blanket on the 50 yard line of Autzen Stadium, and away we went. Long story short, it all started with Europe 72.

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Poster: midnight sun Date: Mar 2, 2010 3:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

listened to Live Dead, then attended a show expecting Dark Star and was disappointed that i traveled hundreds of miles to hear an Alabama Getaway opener, momentarily redeemed by Bird Song...tapes started to trickle down the grapevine mixed with studio albums, then attended more shows along with tapes of those shows and tapes traded at those shows along with contacts for more tapes, then more tapes and more shows and more tapes and more shows...


referencing your previous post LIA;

- doubt Touch Of Grey would have been a hit w/o an increased audience base (made possible through trading) if so, then Eyes, Est, Help, Scarlet (to name a few...) would also have been hits

- jazz fans wanting to hear very different interpretations were the first to buy out-takes of their fav recordings (long before CD's) on the other hand, pop audiences had little interest in hearing what would only be considered inferior versions of their favs

- during the 80's the band stated numerous times they believed they benefited from tape trading (don't see what is so "generous" about a business plan designed to profit a corporation anymore than "buy 1 get 2nd for half price" coupons could be considered altruistic) if anything i'm amazed that it took them so long to figure out the "bootlegging bad" industry dogma didn't apply to them

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Mar 2, 2010 6:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

I also think the band gained more fans through tape-trading, but it's not the sort of thing you can prove through numbers. I mean, to get a tape, you'd have to be hanging out with a deadhead anyway....
And so much depends on what you hear. Lots of people were turned on by '80s tapes that would've killed my interest.

Many people have mentioned that however they got into the band, the interest was SUSTAINED by the existence of this huge catalog of shows. So we have this 'aboveground' Dead discography of a few studio & live albums, and this bottomless pool of 'traded shows' that you can dive in for years - which distinguishes the Dead from most groups, that 'underground' side that only "real" fans can get into.

It's true, the audience base kept increasing through the '80s, whether through tapes or, perhaps more just through stories of great shows. (Certainly it wasn't from any new albums!) The thing about Touch of Grey, not only was it a single (unlike numerous earlier songs, like some you mentioned), it was highly promoted, and even had a funny video; so it reached lots of people who never would've mingled with deadheads before. So then, of course, they came to the shows and found DRUGS! CHICKS! A NEVER-ENDING PARTY!....
So I suspect it would have been a hit even with no tape-trading.

I did mention that jazz fans were the first to get into outtakes & multiple show recordings. When this mentality spread to the "pop" world is a complicated issue -
The bootleg market for certain rock artists was already thriving by 1970; so it seems that generation would have been happy to buy outtakes/series of shows if they'd been available. It just took record companies a couple decades to catch up.
It also depends which artist. Some are more "bootleggable" than others. You can often measure an artist's importance or quality (as opposed to popularity) by how many bootlegs they have! And some artists, like I said, hate releasing any outtakes or live shows anyway, since they feel differently than their fans.

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Mar 2, 2010 1:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....


I'm pretty sure Steal Your Face was my first GD album, closely followed by Live/Dead.

My very first 'introduction' to the Grateful Dead was my friend singing Casey Jones while we walked to school and I asked him something goofy like what song is that, what band plays it? Which prompted my to purchase SYF.

The rest, as they say, is history.

Side note: I played the crap out of Live/Dead for many years.

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Poster: groovernut Date: Mar 2, 2010 1:31pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Got dragged to a show... loved it. Got tapes later. Would not have stayed interested in the band this long if I did not have access to the 30 year catalog of shows...

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Poster: Jobygoob Date: Mar 2, 2010 1:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

I had heard of the band through the girl sitting behind me in my homeroom class, who had talked about the music and sneaking away from her previous boarding school to go to shows. I really had no clue what it was all about though. One afternoon, while playing hooky over at her parent's house, I was gifted a copy of Harpur College on a single cassette (long before DP 8) which consisted of all the acoustic set except for Cold Jordan for some reason, and a few songs of the electric set. I was subsequently hooked, especially amazed by the disparity of the sweet sound of the acoustic set and the hard rocking psychedelia of the electric. It's certainly possible I might have eventually come into the fold through their studio or live releases but I truly believe the abundance and availability of their live shows on tape was a huge essential part of my falling in love with the band.

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Poster: Hal R Date: Mar 2, 2010 6:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

What Got Me On The Bus - part 2

Next buy was Anthem of The Sun and I was just amazed by the complexity and power and the 1st record with Viola Lee Blues which I played over and over and thought was mind blowing. Then came Live Dead with Dark Star, St. Stephen and the Eleven and it seemed as though I had just been given the key to open the gates to the universe. There was just a tremendous opening that happened. This was a new reality. I was on a cosmic journey. Then American Beauty and Workingman’s which just seemed to wrap around me and hug me with comfort and pleasure in simplicity and the roots and an appreciation for the little joys and the rural blue collar world I lived in.

I was 16 and it was 1972 when I heard Skull and Roses and the world was exciting and I knew I was going to eventually get out of this farming and manufacturing town. I also knew that I was not going to end up in some war in Asia shooting at someone or being shot at for Tricky Dick or his bunch of idiots, no way, I knew I would find a way to avoid that, that was the big part of any future plans. My friends and I were becoming Freaks. We were reading books by Abbie Hoffman, Alan Watts, Kurt Vonnegut, Carlos Castaneda; The Greening of America, Future Shock, A Child’s Garden of Grass, The Electric Kool Aid Acid Test, The Making of A Counterculture, Zap Commix and the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers and underground newspapers from Iowa City and turning on. We listened to the bands from Woodstock and San Francisco and David Peel and Bob Dylan and Firesign Theater and of course the Beatles, Rolling Stones and Who. As time went on our identification with the Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young were part of what gave us our common brotherhood and made us stand out. Some of you are smiling now as you read this because you were there with us in different places throughout the country. We were the Freaks!

For our graduation in 1974 we nominated Truckin’ as our class song and it would have won had not all the straights tripped out on the fact that the Freaks were going to have a song by the Grateful Dead be the class song. People were actually lobbied not to vote for Truckin’, girls told their boyfriends not to or else! We lost.

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Poster: Hal R Date: Mar 2, 2010 7:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

What Got Me On The Bus - part 3

So shoot ahead to 1978 and listening to the band all that time, even finding awesome bootleg records (one was 2/13/70 which blew me away) and it all being wrapped in with reading the Beats and learning to meditate and having the Whole Earth Catalog be my bible and backpacking and hitchhiking and altered hikes in the woods. The show was 2/5/78 at the UNI Dome, University of Northern Iowa and only a few in our group of extended friends had seen them because they hadn’t played around here for four years. Some of us had been primed for this for six or seven years. There was the actual Jerry Garcia on stage playing for us! It was so much better than we had ever even imagined. We were yelling at each other “I can’t believe we are finally seeing the Grateful Dead” and they played Truckin’ and we were blissful dancing screaming beaming fools. We were hearing our band at last. We were home.

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Mar 2, 2010 6:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

While I was aware of the Dead in the '70s through the radio and listening to my friends older brother's Europe '72 album, I did not really get into them until I was in college in 1984 when while taking summer classes and studying with a deadhead buddy, I was stunned to hear the tapes he was putting on. I bugged him to put together some compilation tapes for me, however he ended up giving me tapes that fall of concerts that he thought I would enjoy. The first few were from October '84 then as the school year progressed he throw in some '74, '69 and '67 to go along with the '82- Spring '85 shows he was mostly providing. So all i listened to were tapes. The first album I ever purchased was Without A Net in 1990 and didn't purchase a studio album until 2003 or 2004 through itunes (i had kind of forgot about the Dead from 1995-2003). I discovered this place in 2005 and rekindled my love. I have made many many purchases, old and new releases, live and studio albums since. I wrote a post about Rhino and the GD owing this place a great deal and as I recall I was not the only one whose purchases of GD commercial releases was stimulated by what was happening here.

This post was modified by elbow1126 on 2010-03-03 02:39:27

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Mar 2, 2010 6:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Live. Saw a video of them on Night Flight playing on the road again. Went to Strawberry's the next day to purchase Shakedown street on a recommendation and the guy gave me For the faithful by mistake, with the version of on the road again. Rest is history

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Mar 2, 2010 9:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

couldnt really stand GD until 1983 when a friend of mine gave me good ol' 5/8/77 to listen to. Had only heard studio up to that point. Popped in the tape, a smile grew upon my ugly mug, and then it was hook, line, and sinker during the Scarlet>Fire segue. That was all she wrote as the bus came by and I got on.

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Poster: jerrys beard Date: Mar 3, 2010 6:02am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Live/Dead...was a sophomore in high school south of SF, been listening to Dead, Doors, Hendrix, Who, Cream, Sabbath, Traffic. Moving from pot into acid and then Live/Dead hit. Wore out DS>St>Eleven...couldn't get enough and didn't know why. Like nothing else out there. Starting looking for Deadheads in HS, friends of tapers, tapes, bought/borrowed everything I could. Started going to shows in the city with friends when I could and there was no turning back. Then the change with Workingman's and American Beauty blew me away again...

Graduated HS, moved south the San Diego for college and found another great Dead community to feed the need. Saw the Dead when they came through. It has grown from there.

Saw them last at Irvine in 84 (?) taking a friend who was a music critic for a SD paper who had never seen the Dead. Figured he needed to see for himself. Was going to take my son to see JGB in San Berdo when Jerry died. Still bothers me.

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Poster: snori Date: Mar 3, 2010 1:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

First heard Live/Dead while tripping in 1971, and suddenly a lot of what I had been listening to no longer seemed enough. Realised that the live music was where it was at, but bought the studio albums too. I used to buy bootleg LPs in a little record shop in an alley off Carnaby Street. Not many opportunities to see them in the UK, when I could have they cancelled, when they played I was in a bad way. Finally saw them in 1990, and also came across a good (and improving) fanzine called 'Spiral Light'. I'd heard that people traded cassettes, and there in the ads page was where I found them. Traded like a man possessed to begin with, then with a smaller group of friends. We still keep in touch in the new digital world, but it's more a case of pointing out new shows available than actual trading.

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Mar 2, 2010 1:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

For me is was borrowing Europe 72 from a friend who bought it for the cover (no shit !) . Finally got to see them (10/14/76) at the Shrine ,then at the Swing (2/26/77) . I remember coming out of that Swing show, thinking, how radically different the shows were . One show, mostly songs, some jamming , 2nd show lots of jamming ( + the 2 new songs premiered that night ), AND, unless you count US Blues, NONE of their few well known "hits" either night . What kind of band was this ? I was intrigued ! So , besides their musical strengths, the the fun we all had, it was how very interesting this band was .

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Mar 3, 2010 8:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

well it depends what you mean by got into. The first exposure I had was greatest hits type stuff - Skeletons and WALSTIB ( which at least has an interesting mix )but it wasn't until Skull and Roses ( offical release but still live ) that I really understood what it was all about

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Poster: Finster Baby Date: Mar 2, 2010 5:22pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

It started in high school for me. Listening to studio and live albums that a new friend had. Remember listening to Woekingman's, American Beauty, and Dead Set alot. It all blossomed from there. It would be another 2 years before I saw them live. Started collecting tapes somewhere around that time as well. Wish I could turn back time and be able to discover all of this wonderful music with fresh ears all over again.

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Poster: snow_and_rain Date: Mar 2, 2010 7:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

I first listened to "Skeletons in the Closet" a bit when I was in high school, but I don't think I really grooved on them that much until I'd heard a bootleg or two and had gone out and bought Skull Fu... I mean, Skull and Roses. Those versions of those songs are seared in my memeory -- probably why I like '71 so much.

But I can't say that I really "got it" until I actually saw them live, about halfway through Let It Grow. Being at a big live show like that was a very different ballgame for me.

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Poster: buscameby Date: Mar 2, 2010 9:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

I remember hearing Truckin on the radio growin up in Cincy but that was about it, except for the real occasional "Casey Jones".

I got to Denver in the Fall of 77' and went to a nice private Jesuit college in NW Denver. The whole floor I lived on was 75% full of Acid heads and Rockers. The Boys from LA and Chitown seemed to have the best collections of new music to my ears. Great Jazz, folk and the mix of old blues players, they also had the first TAPES of the Grateful Dead, along with albums I never heard of before. I brought out 50 tabs a friend gave me the night before I left for school, he said "show those freaks in Denver how we party in Cincinnati"-lol.

I remember the first weekend we went to the YMCA camp in Granby and after dinner I pulled out the tabs. They had a huge bonfire and great stereo system. We played Beatles , Marley, Clapton etc, then somebody dropped the Live Dead on and that was where I left the planet with the Boys first time.

Two weeks later they announced the first McNichol's show, 10-9-77', I still remember Jerry lifting me out of my chair during the Dire Wolf, Lazy Lightning was so ethereal I barley was able to keep my molecules from disintegrating.

After the intermission which I couldn't even stand up during, I just sat there like the Cheshire Cat grinning out the window of my fragile blown mind. The Scarlett kicked off and I rose out of my seat ya all, Cause I just had to dance! Fire lit the afterburners and away I went out to the cosmos, Jerry leading the way. The next thing I remember was the wonderful group of String Players sitting in black robes on stage left playing like Jehovah's quartet during Terrapin( oh yeah found out latter I was the only one who saw them) Not sure where I went for the next 30 or 40 minutes but I do remember dancin' hard , smilin' big and and blown away by the power of the Round and Round.

Little did I know that the playing of Casey Jones would be a foretelling of my next 5 years in school, feeding my two craziest habits demon powder and THE GRATEFUL DEAD, fought to kick one habit but the good habit lead deeper and deeper down the rabbit hole and I don't think I found my way out yet.

Thanks for reminding me LIA!!!!!!

Jerry's gone but the Muse lives on, can't wait for Furthur this weekend.

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Poster: skuzzlebutt Date: Mar 3, 2010 1:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

In the summer of '82 someone played me a snatch of "Europe '72" and it caught my interest. Not long after I aquired "American Beauty" and a vinyl boot of 11/24/78 called "For Deadheads Only". Didn't actually get around to seeing them until the Fall of '83, though.

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Mar 2, 2010 3:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

a combination of a fascination with '60s SF & Garcia's 'Cats Under the Stars' ... the live sound came later

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 3, 2010 7:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Tapes played no role at all for me. It was only seeing them live, and now, of course, being able to relive it (I've finally figured out what the internet is actually for!) - the actual concerts were what stayed with me, I think they sort of haunted me. Various friends traded tapes and I never had the slightest interest in that at the time. Of course I listened to American Beauty 9000 times, but if I didn't remember the concerts, it would not have meant much.

This post was modified by ringolevio on 2010-03-03 15:14:44

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Poster: Solo Head Date: Mar 3, 2010 7:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....are redundant?

Did not we have this discussion a month ago...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqPiJ0L7YmY

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Poster: Edsel Date: Mar 3, 2010 7:51am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....are redundant?

I heard them live a couple of times before I heard them any other way. Started listening to KMPX and heard cuts from the first album, and live takes from shows. Great radio station in those days. Heard cuts from various groups that I haven't heard since.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 3, 2010 9:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

Albums (#1) in 67; had all they had made before seeing them in 74. Did "hear" them from the car (parents wouldn't let me out) in GGPk in 67, while dropping the older bros off to go, but that doesn't count...

Did not have a tape til after seeing them; it really took off in 75 in the Bay Area.

However, I did have many boot leg albums by 75; they came first in the Bay Area (by 73 you could buy the 71 shows GoP and I are always chatting about).

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Poster: Hal R Date: Mar 2, 2010 6:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

I posted this on dead.net on a topic I suggested starting. What Got You On the Bus?

part 1

I walked in to my high school American Literature class and there leaning against the chalkboard at the front of the class was a record cover with a fantastic picture of a skeleton with roses in on its’ head and the words Grateful Dead above it. I had read about the legendary band in Rolling Stone and heard a song or two on Beaker Street AM radio from Little Rock late at night and on KUNI-FM public radio but I had never seen one of their records, it beckoned to me throughout the class. I couldn’t wait to hear it. Towards the end of class we got to have music in the background while we read for 20 minutes. The volume was pretty low but I liked the rhythms that I heard. My friend Archie and I started talking after class and he told me it was his record and I asked if I could borrow it.

I took it home, placed it on the stereo and looked at the picture of the band inside the cover. Wow, these guys are real hippies, with tie dye shirts; they are not pretty boys, that’s cool. Out of the speakers jumped Bertha with the loud bouncing bass line, a sweet lead vocal, nice harmonies, an organ, curious rhythm guitar and a great guitar solo. This was not Grand Funk Railroad or Black Sabbath; hey these guys are really good. They might be as good as Jefferson Airplane or Santana or CCR or maybe even Cream or the Doors. I turned the song way up and rocked and then what ? A country song? What is this? Mama Tried? Merle Haggard? Hell, I was trying to avoid that shit, I lived in the middle of Iowa corn country and it was everywhere. But hey it sounds pretty good the way they do it, I had to admit. Big Railroad Blues, a pretty good rocker and Playing in The Band, that one cooks. Play the next side and what? A drum solo, they are starting a record with a drum solo? But then there is this great bass line and really intense energy and great guitar and then it slows way down and speeds up and slows down and speeds up; this is different than any rock and roll I ever heard . But I think I like it, I think I like it a lot, I think. It’s kind of weird though. That must be the psychedelic part, but I kind of think I like it, lots, I think. Funny name, The Other One. OK, more rockers, Me and My Uncle, Big Boss Man, Me and Bobby McGee, Johnny B. Goode, great. Then a really slow song, “Wharf Rat”, I like the voice, but this is really kind of slow. Hey wait a minute, he just said fucker on a record! Wow, I think that’s cool. Then more great rockers Not Fade Away and Goin’ Down the Road.

I must have played the whole album 20 or so times in the next week or so and played Bertha, Playing In the Band, Me and Bobby McGee, Johnny B. Goode and Not Fade Away about 100 times. Seriously, I was hooked. Finally Archie demanded he get his record back. I picked up a copy the next time we went to Cedar Rapids, 40 miles away.

Next one was Europe 72 and I swear on the bridge between China Cat Sunflower and I Know You Rider some of kind of inner switch was turned on. You know what I mean. If you are here you understand. Then Truckin’ and the beauty of Morning Dew just strengthened it, whatever it was. I felt like the music was inside of me, like it was a vital part of me, an inner force.

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Poster: user unknown Date: Mar 2, 2010 3:43pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: How many of you....

1967-The Grateful Dead was the start...various other studio albums followed

...heard a hideous hig-gen AUD tape of some 80's show in the early 90's and almost stopped listening to GD completely...fell back to my studio releases

got into live recordings in 2002

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